The Problem With Britain’s “Most Haunted House”

I’ve had a Fortean Times subscription for a number of years because I largely find the features interesting, but I’ve found myself becoming more and more frustrated at certain features in the last year or so when certain ghost stories are given uncritical promotion, or when the author fails to remain unbiased. In FT327 The Cage in St Osyth, Essex is given a four page spread and is dubbed as “The Most Haunted House In Britain”. The piece, written by John Fraser, provides a nice introduction to the location and it’s fascinating history of imprisoned witches and some of the spooky activity people claim to have witnessed, but he makes a glaring error. Continue reading

The Enfield Haunting: A Contemporary Ghost Researcher Reflects…

The Enfield Poltergeist case began in 1977 when a set of disturbances started happening in a council house in Enfield, London that would become one of the most famous (some would say infamous) poltergeist cases in the history of the United Kingdom. Peggy Hodgson, a single mother who lived with her four children Margaret, thirteen; Janet, eleven; Johnny, ten; and Billy, seven, called her neighbours, the police and then the media who all witnessed strange activity for themselves. Continue reading

Weakly Ghost Bulletin #8.5

It seems that I was a bit premature when I published the Weakly Ghost Bulletin #8 yesterday and there are a few stories that came to my attention after I had published the bulletin. With this in mind I am going to start publishing the WGB on a Sunday in an attempt to avoid this. For now though, here is #8.5 Continue reading

Thoughts On The “Religion Flies Planes Into Buildings” Bullshit

Terrorism, according to the Global Terrorism Index (GTI) is ‘the threatened or actual use of illegal force and violence by a non-state actor to attain a political, economic, religious or social goal through fear, coercion, or intimidation’. According to the GTI, in 2014 alone 17,958 people were killed in terrorist attacks which is 61% more than the previous year. 82% of all deaths from terrorist attacks occur in just 5 countries: Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nigeria and Syria and 90% of these attacks occurred in countries that already have gross human rights violations. Four groups were the dominant contributors: the Taliban, Boko Haram, ISIL, and al Qa’ida. Continue reading