I Am A QEDcon Fan, Here’s Why

I feel as though QEDcon and the organisation team behind it does not get enough credit. Sure, they won an award last year for their brilliance, sure there are thousands of adoring tweets and Facebook messages telling them how amazing they and their events are, sure they sell every ticket and pack out the large venue in Manchester, sure over 500 people applaud for them as hard as they can without breaking their fingers, sure people get emotional when they have to leave – as though they’re leaving behind someone that they love dearly, sure people have- in just five years- become fiercely loyal to QEDcon despite not being personally involved or invested, and sure people who leave the 2015 conference have already planned their trip to the 2016 conference, and most of the people who attended the 2015 conference bought their tickets as soon as they went on sale in 2014… but I feel as though QEDcon does not get enough credit. Continue reading I Am A QEDcon Fan, Here’s Why

My journey into non-belief

I recently wrote on my social media accounts that I no longer identified with the skeptic movement and followed this up with a blog post explaining what I meant. A small group of people from the skeptic movement claimed I was merely seeking attention and I took the blog post down because I didn’t want to be forced into a dialogue defending why I do or do not identify with certain groups of people. Continue reading My journey into non-belief

Shoulder to shoulder

I got my copy of New Humanist in the post today and in the editorial there is a section titled ‘The side of the angels?’ that opens with

Even if you’re not the kind of person who picks fights with religion, it can sometimes be hard to avoid confrontation. On so many issues arising in our secular society, religion seems to be on the wrong side. Though we didn’t plan it this way this issue highlights many debates in which religious voices seem to be standing in the way of rational arguments and human rights … in all these cases, rather than seeing religion as the root cause, it might make more sense to view it as part of the cluster of archaic beliefs and social mores that need to be revisited and, where appropriate, disposed of because they don’t measure up to our contemporary view of what constitutes reasonable moral behaviour.

Continue reading Shoulder to shoulder