Are Ghost Orbs Really Still a Thing?

In 2012 I delivered a talk about ghost research at a CFI UK conference at Conway Hall. Unknown to me, a man towards the rear of the hall became visibly angered during my talk and during the Q&A session he stood up and accused me of mischaracterising ghost researchers. Why? Because a small portion of my speech touched upon orb phenomena which many ghost hunters class as the first stage of spirit manifestation. Ghosts, it is often said, then manifest in other forms before becoming an apparition. However, my critic was having none of it and to paraphrase him, “ghost hunters do not believe that. Only those on the very fringes present orbs as evidence.” Continue reading Are Ghost Orbs Really Still a Thing?

Biased Ghost Research: Is Seeing Really Believing?

When ghost hunters attempt to research ghosts in a scientific way one of the first mistakes that they will make is insisting that although their methodology might look unscientific to the outside observer, this simply isn’t the case. Ghost hunters often conduct their investigations in the dark, use pieces of equipment that have no real use in ghost research (such as EMF meters, REM pods, Dictaphones and similar), may employ the use of psychics and mediums, and use spirit communication techniques because they claim that they are attempting to experience the occurence reported to them by the eye-witness. Continue reading Biased Ghost Research: Is Seeing Really Believing?

Don Philips Still Playing The Science Game. Still Losing.

In the last few months, I have had a number of conversations with people who have found my previous blog posts about Don Philips. Philips, it seems, along with Steve Mera, has been causing a fair bit of concern states side with their claims and research ethics. Continue reading Don Philips Still Playing The Science Game. Still Losing.

How To Prove A Skeptic Wrong

I am a skeptic and, believe it or not, underneath these scales that I wear as a skin I am a human being and human beings are typically silly creatures. We’ve got these things called confirmation biases and our brains confuse us into seeing meaning where there is none and as a result we make decisions and claims that are irrational or illogical. When we try to be rational about things as skeptics often do, we are working against our instincts and sometimes (believe it or not) people who identify as skeptics get things… wrong. Continue reading How To Prove A Skeptic Wrong