So, You’ve Been Called A Racist…

Yesterday after news that more people in the United Kingdom voted to Leave the European Union than had voted to Remain, I found myself in the bizarre position of trying to explain to a small group of people that just because they were Leave voters and they were not racist didn’t mean that racism wasn’t an issue. It was almost like a scene from a film in which the director is trying to make a point about white privilege. “It’s about something more than immigration” one white woman moaned, “and I’m not racist. How dare they say I’m racist?”

I wanted to tell her that it was incredible that she was making this about her when friends of mine (plural) have taken to social media to share incidents of racial abuse they have been subjected to just in the few hours since the EU Referendum result was announced. Social media has been awash with people hurling racial abuse at strangers and it is worrying that this result, and the concerning language used by Nigel Farage and others on the Far Right in this country have normalised this sort of discriminatory behaviour.

In an interview with Alternet, Noam Chomsky attributed the popularity of Donald Trump to the creation of fear, commenting that “People feel isolated, helpless, victim of powerful forces that they do not understand and cannot influence.”

It is predominantly people in the working classes of Britain who have felt the results of the changing economy – especially the harsh welfare cuts and funding cuts to services brought into place by the Conservative government. For some though the blame doesn’t lay directly with these right-wing politicians but, instead, with people coming to take what is ours.

The Telegraph reported that one of the predictors of whether an area of England voted Leave was how few immigrants actually live there, proving surely that this is about isolated people lashing out at abstract fears about the person coming to get them and what they have?

When I look at Nigel Farage and his ilk I see a less-blunt version of Donald Trump who blames all of the ills on this country on foreigners and invisible powers such as the so-called “unelected EU”. They’re coming to take your job, they’re coming to kill you, they bring disease and crime… and although all of these distasteful accusations are untrue it’s easy to see why people who believe them might have cause to be afraid and might look for a leader to rally behind.

The language of hatred and fear can have dangerous outcomes and I am fearful of what may come in the next few years. I find it terrifying that Britain First (whom I consider a hate group) have been conducting military training for its members and speak of war and violence as a means to achieve their aims. They’ve been associated with the assassination of Jo Cox (which they’ve denied) and have also threatened the mayor of London, Sadiq Kahn, cabinet member Sajid Javid and others with “direct action” because they’re Muslim.

I worry about the divisive language used by mainstream politicians (David Cameron calling refugees a swarm, for example) that gives this extremism a green light.

Discriminatory abuse and violence is going to get worse and I no longer recognise the country I grew up in because of it. There has always been racism, sexism, homophobia, classism, ageism… but I’ve never felt as though they had true power over us.

That has changed. It has been legitimised by men is suits such as Nigel Farage and we’re all going to suffer for it. He plays the politics of hatred and it is him- not immigrants -that is making Great Britain a worse place.

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Hayley Stevens

Hayley is a ghost geek and started to blog in 2007. She uses scientific scepticism to investigate weird stuff and writes about it here while also speaking publicly about how to hunt ghosts as a skeptic.

One thought on “So, You’ve Been Called A Racist…”

  1. The article in The Telegraph outlines where UKIP votes may come from using the volume of immigration as a predictor. It does not refer to the EU vote – that is purely your interpretation. As it turned out, those areas with a higher level of immigrant population pretty much had the highest turnout and the biggest ‘out’ majorities.
    I think the feeling about UKIP, and in particular Nigel Farage, by the majority of UK voters was reflected in the last election. They have one member of parliament and it isn’t even their leader.

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